Finished: 11 PM Mon 07 Oct 19 UTC
Private C vs G 1v1
1 day /phase
Pot: 10 D - Spring, 1903, Finished
1 excused missed turn
Game won by GEN.NEDROW (146 D)
02 Oct 19 UTC Spring, 1901: Here I typed this out to help the other guys in our first game:

Okay so the objective of the game is be the first to 18 Supply Centers. Every country starts with 3 except for Russia which has 4. Each supply center can support either one army or one fleet. As you acquire new SCs, you can build more armies and fleets.

There are 4 types of orders that you can give each unit.
1. Hold
2. Move/Attack
3. Support Move/Support Hold
4. Convoy (Fleets Only)

Fleets can only occupy sea and coastal territories and armies can only occupy land territories.

Each territory can only be occupied by ONE UNIT AT A TIME and all units are equal strength. So be warned, if you move two of your own units to the same location, they will both be bounced out.

Now as an example for general gameplay, if the army in Trieste attacks the army in Venice, it cannot take it because they are equal strength. But if Germany had an army in Tyrolia and supported the Austrian army into Venice, then the attack would succeed and the Italian player would have to retreat to an adjacent territory.

That same scenario could be replicated by having a fleet in the Adriatic Sea instead to support the move (this works because fleets can occupy coastal spaces, therefore they can support attacks and holds to, from, and at coastal locations).

Now say if Italy had an army in Rome and he suspects an attack at Venice, he can use that army to support hold his unit in Venice. Now since it’s a strength of 2v2, the attacking armies would fail in taking Venice.

Convoying is an order that lets you transport your armies across oceans by using your fleets.

For example, if England wanted to transport an army from Yorkshire to Norway, he’d have to have a fleet in the North Sea. He’d then give both units corresponding orders, meaning that he’d order the fleet to convoy unit from Yor to Nor and he’d order the army to move to Nor via convoy.

Other nations can convoy your armies and vice versa. Other nations can support your attacks and vice versa. Other nations can support hold your locations and vice versa. Hence why finding allies is so important in the beginning.

Also this is unlike most games in that each player doesn’t take their turns one at a time. In other words everybody’s orders are resolved at the same time. This adds to the intrigue because you don’t know for sure who will do what they said they would until after the turn is resolved.
03 Oct 19 UTC Spring, 1901: GameMaster: Game was extended due to at least 1 member failing to enter orders and having an excused missed turn available. This has un-readied all orders.
04 Oct 19 UTC Spring, 1901: Okay thanks. I am assuming the black dots are the sc’s?
04 Oct 19 UTC Spring, 1901: You got it.
06 Oct 19 UTC GameMaster: Game was extended due to at least 1 member failing to enter orders and having an excused missed turn available. This has un-readied all orders.

Start Backward Open large map Forward End

Germany
GEN.NEDROW (146 D)
Won. Bet: 5 D, won: 5 D
9 supply-centers, 8 units
Italy
garrenburgess (100 D)
Resigned. Bet: 5 D
5 supply-centers, 4 units
Civil Disorders
garrenburgess (100 D)Italy (Spring, 1903) with 5 centres.
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